From:John Yushkevich e-mail:yushkevj@bms.com
Subject:RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: Deluxe cam removal Date:Mon Feb 8 08:18:44 2010
Response to:2792
John :
Glad everything worked out. Make sure on reassembly you align the set screw hole.
I like the idea Russel came up with using the machinest jack in the flywheel chamber. More than one way to skin a cat!
:John

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John, Russell, and Steve;
Cam is out. Thanks for the help and info. I borrowed a slide hammer with a 3/8-16 thread, so I just welded a 3/8-16 nut to a 1/2-20 nut (If anybody needs it, I will gladly donate).
I don't think the bushing/bearing has ever been out of cases as it was snug. I found it very interesting how they split that bearing, machining two notches almost thru bearing and then splitting it.
I'm sure I'll have more questions as I start the re-build. Thanks again for all the help.
John Weatherwax

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Not so sure it's a good idea to leave the camshaft running loose. It's not too difficult to line bore the case using fairly basic equipment. This was covered in an earlier post - no 898 - back in 2005. No, I don't have that good a memory but I did remember posting it sometime and I've just scrolled down and found that it is still there. Attached is a picture of my setup. This won't check that the camshaft is parallel to the crank but at least it is well supported by all three bearings. As for bolting on the pan, it is relatively easy to check that the mating surfaces are flat on a large surface plate - they probably won't be. I know a well-respected engine builder over here who makes gaskets of tapering thickness to allow for this, but it is fairly easily remedied. If you don't have machine shop facilities, even a file and lots of patience can improve the situation considerably. If the gasket faces are flat and parallel, they are less likely to distort everything as they are tightened up. The same applies when the engine is bolted into the frame. Make sure the engine sits squarely on all four frame lugs before bolting up. Any gaps between engine and frame are easily corrected by filing a little off the tall bosses or, as in my case on the model K, adjusting the height of the spacers that the engine sits on. All four of mine are slightly different heights so are stamped to identify which one goes where. All this is time consuming - some may say too fussy - but when it's all together and running sweetly it's worth every minute (hour?) spent on the detail! - Steve



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I would like to add comments to what John has said. The slide hammer is a good idea that I like if you have machinist capacities, another way is to use a machinist jack in the flywheel pocket to push into the centerdrilled cam back or even the cam rear face. If you don't have one of them "jack" you can pry it forward from the flywheel pocket using aluminium, brass, wood as well.
As stated below besure to line you lobe uo wth the #2 cam main bearing groove. Those grooves were/are a little tricky to machine in but they are required. I think the factory broached them but I drill them, either way it works.
Align boring the cam bores was & is very difficult and something the factory was not always good at. I have checked several unblemished KJ cases to find #2 out of line relative to #1 & #3 by as much as .005", in that condition you have to run the cam loose. Keep in mind bolting on the pan will change that, better or worse.
Modern engines pressurize their cams but industry standards up to the 40's did not did not push this idea so at least on these machines loose cam bearings have no affect on oil pressure. I hope this helps or at least does not cause anger. Russell
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John:
As I recall, there is a slot in the center cam bearing bore that allows clearance for the #3 exhaust cam lobe to pass when removing the cam with bearing. What I did on mine is turned on a lathe an adaptor to screw on to my slide hammer and on to the cam nut thread and "lightly" tapped the cam out after heating the case. Just be sure the #3 exhaust cam lobe is alagined with the slot in the bore. Otherwise the cam lobe will make its own slot.
Upon reassembly, what really should be done, depending on cam and bearing wear, is to have the cam ground and rehardened and to either make new cam bearings or to have the old ones reconditioned then line bore them in the case. I strongly recommend this. Many an engines loss of oil pressure can be attributed to nothing being done to cam bearings because the thought is that it turns half the speed so it has half the wear. As far as bearing reconditioning is concerned, someone like Rob Olesn may also have some good feedback.
:John
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I am in the process of tearing down a 1929 Henderson Deluxe engine for re-build. Last item for removal is camshaft. I heated the cases and removed front bushing, but center bushing is tight in case. I haven't heated it yet, but I got to thinking about alignment of the bearings upon going back together. Any advise or help appreciated.
John Weatherwax